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Finding time to focus on self-care can seem impossible, especially during a pandemic with the demands of work and family life.

Time for yourself is time away from your daily list of chores, responsibilities and commitments. These things will usually still be there even if you take 15 minutes or even an hour to yourself.

Research shows that people who regularly take a little time to themselves, and are comfortable with that time alone, experience increased happiness, better stress management and lower rates of depression.

Unplug.

Step away from social media, email and phone calls, and instead read a book or magazine, go for a walk, or simply stare out the window and daydream. Our devices have become an entertainment crutch, and the go-to when we have a minute to spare.

Finish Work on Time.

This is one of the simplest things you can do when you need a little personal time. This had become much more difficult since we are all now working from home, the end-of-day has become fluid and the result is self-care time has decreased or vanished. If this is you, make it a point to stop work exactly on time at least once a week, and make that saved time self-care time. Practicing some sort of self-care, even once a week will make a difference.

Check in on Yourself.

Take a minute throughout your day to stop, just for a moment, to notice what is happening within and around you. Taking just a moment to reset your mind can help keep you balanced and happier.

Connect.

Reach out to others, sometimes a chat with a friend is all the self-care you need. If you feel you may need help with emotional support, consider a professional counselor to have your thoughts and feelings heard.



 

If you’d like to speak to a friendly, fully qualified and licensed Therapist, contact us through the form below. It’s completely confidential, and covered by most insurances.

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Here is a list of things in 2020 which I am thankful for – my Covid-19 gratitude list:

1. This pandemic and lockdown has given me enough time to be able to relax, rest, and think about my life, my priorities, my beliefs, my goals.

2. This situation has made me realize who my true friends are.

3. “How are you?” means something to me now.

4. I am now truly focused on the present.

5. Every morning I am grateful that my family and friends are healthy.

7. Money is needed, of course, but the pandemic has taught me how little we actually need to have a fulfilling life.

9. I’ve learned to cherish things I took for granted earlier.

10. I now see that nature can easily exist without man, but man wouldn’t last very long without nature, which is a humbling revelation.


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It is normal to feel stressed or overwhelmed at this moment in time. Emotions may include anxiety, fear, a feeling of being out of control.

Taking care of yourself is extremely important now more than ever. Here are a few tips:

Plan your day: As tempting as it might be to stay in pyjamas all day, regular routines are essential for our identity, self-confidence and purpose.

Get physical: Move more every day. Explore different ways of adding physical movement and activity to your day and find some that work best for you.

Relax: Relaxing and focusing on the present can help improve your mental health and lighten negative feelings.

Stay in-touch: This could be anything, from sharing a cup of tea over video, playing an online game together, or simply sending a supportive text-message.

Remember yourself: Take time to reflect and practice self-compassion: Mindfulness techniques may also help you focus on the present rather than dwelling on unhelpful thoughts.

Improve your sleep: Wind down before bed by avoiding using your phone, tablet, computer or TV for an hour before bedtime.

Changes in your emotional state that become persistent or interfere with daily life may need a little extra self-care:

  • Trouble focusing on daily tasks
  • Persistent, heightened anxiety
  • Elevated emotional state
  • Feelings of helplessness
  • Fear for family or your future

If you are experiencing any of the above, and feel a little extra support is needed, talk to us. Schedule an appointment with one of our full trained Online Counselors.

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(Please write N/A if you do not currently have one)


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Self-care is a regular, intentional process of devoting oneself to protecting and sustaining mental health.

Small things make a difference.

When we are busy, it’s easy to let self-care fall by the wayside. Or if we make too big a plan, we might give up if we can’t find the time and energy to see it through. Break rituals are activities that we embed into our day to help us stay calibrated and avoid mental overload. We can’t falsely promise ourselves that we’ll relax once something gets scratched off our lists, because in the meantime, 10 new things will pop up. Just as when we neglect ourselves there is a cumulative effect on our health, the same is true when we make a regular point to nourish our mind, body and souls.

Self-care comes in many shapes and sizes.

There’s no one size-fits-all formula. Key activities include lifestyle medicine, creative pursuits, hobbies, time with loved ones, and positive mental dialogue. Science shows the tremendous value in all of these activities to protect and bolster mental health. Engage in a process of reflection (therapists, coaches and loved ones can be helpful in co-creating ideas) that helps you identify high impact activities that can be woven into your routines.

Self-care starts with giving yourself permission.

Many of us are uncomfortable with the idea of taking time for ourselves. We are used to taking care of everyone else and it’s a big shift to actually focus on you. It feels counterintuitive. This can demonstrate your strong sense of values and pride in serving others, but it can also tie into a deeper martyr complex or sense of unworthiness. When we give ourselves the green light and understand that we are worth our own investment because we are important, we are more likely to maximize the benefits of self-care. You must give yourself permission to take care of yourself, and make sure you are taking break rituals everyday. Sustainability is everything: You are worth it.


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After a traumatic event, it’s normal to feel powerless, anxious, scared, angry. We encourage you to reach out and connect with a professional counselor to explore effective and healthy ways to cope with your emotions.

You may experience feeling hopeless and experience withdrawing or isolating yourself, excessive sleeping, the use of drugs or alcohol more than usual.

At a time like this, simple things can help. Try to:

  • Talk to close friends or family about your feelings
  • Stay present, take breaks from social media and the news
  • Take a walk, go to the gym, run errands to keep active and healthy
  • Spend time in person with family and friends, try to stay positive

Please take care of yourself and those around you – physical health and emotional connectedness can go a long way toward making you feel like yourself again.


If you need to talk to a professional, schedule an appointment with us:

For billing/insurance purposes, we must have your legal name exactly as it appears on your insurance ID Card

(Please write N/A if you do not currently have one)