Trauma.jpg

After a traumatic event, it’s normal to feel powerless, anxious, scared, angry. We encourage you to reach out and connect with a professional counselor to explore effective and healthy ways to cope with your emotions.

You may experience feeling hopeless and experience withdrawing or isolating yourself, excessive sleeping, the use of drugs or alcohol more than usual.

At a time like this, simple things can help. Try to:

  • Talk to close friends or family about your feelings
  • Stay present, take breaks from social media and the news
  • Take a walk, go to the gym, run errands to keep active and healthy
  • Spend time in person with family and friends, try to stay positive

Please take care of yourself and those around you – physical health and emotional connectedness can go a long way toward making you feel like yourself again.


If you need to talk to a professional, schedule an appointment with us:

For billing/insurance purposes, we must have your legal name exactly as it appears on your insurance ID Card

(Please write N/A if you do not currently have one)


WAV-bubble.png

October 2020 is Domestic Violence Awareness Month”

Domestic Violence was already an epidemic before COVID-19, but the pandemic has created an environment which has resulted in a spike in incidents of abuse.

We are experiencing a critical time for survivors. More awareness, education, and bystander intervention is critical if we are to stop the violence.

October 2020 is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we are dedicated to sharing information that can help those who are experiencing violence during this unprecedented time. BCS Counseling Group is running FREE online groups for ‘Support and Empowerment for Domestic Violence Survivors’.

 

PLEASE SEE OUR PARTNER PROGRAM: womenagainstviolence.org


domestic-violence.jpg

An article by : Nicoletta Pallotta

A New Domestic Violence Crisis: Covid-19

Social isolation and working from home, aimed to stop the spread of the coronavirus may be making domestic violence more frequent, more severe and more dangerous. Are you or someone you love being abused? 1 out of every 3 women are in an abusive relationship and this issue becoming even more common during COVID-19, while we are stressed and forced to spend large amounts of time at home together.

Below are 10 common indicators of abuse:

  • Stalking: questioning your every move while telling you that they love you and are being protective
  • Texting or calling you constantly; insisting they are concerned about you and want to make sure that you are safe
  • Controlling your finances: forcing you to account in detail for every dollar that you spend
  • Criticizing you for every little thing you do
  • Humiliating you in front of your family and friends
  • Angering easily, particularly if he or she is drinking
  • Forcing you to have sex against your will
  • Hitting or punching you
  • Jealously of friendships or any other relationships you have
  • Isolating you from family and friends

If you can say yes to even one of these, you are in an abusive relationship.

During a calm stage, it’s easy to remain in the relationship thinking that it won’t happen again, but it doesn’t help to ignore the problem or live in hope that the abuser will change. It’s very important to be prepared and have a safety, back-up plan in case the violence erupts again.

Be prepared in case you need to call a shelter

It’s not accepting defeat to be ready. Find out about legal options or other resources available to you before you have to use them. You should know exactly where to go and how to get there, even if a situation arises the middle of the night.

Prepare an emergency bag, for a quick exit

Keep cash, a checkbook, your savings account details, identification, a medical insurance card and your address book in a safe place where the abuser can’t find it. The last thing you want to be worried about at a time like this is money!

Leave the situation

If it happens, be ready to go. If you have children, take them with you. If you are in immediate danger call 911.


hidden-Crime-670x446-1.png

[A hidden Covid-19 Crisis: Domestic Abuse Rises Worldwide

Social Distancing restrictions aimed to stop the spread of the coronavirus may be making violence in homes more frequent and in some cases, more severe. Children are also especially vulnerable to domestic abuse during this pandemic. Research shows that increased stress levels among parents is often a major predictor of physical abuse and neglect of children and adolescents.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]

  • Nearly 1 in 10 women in the United States have been raped by an intimate partner in her lifetime.

  • 1 out of every 3 women have experienced an abusive relationship.

  • 81% of women who experienced rape, stalking, or physical violence by an intimate partner reported significant short- or long-term impacts such as post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and injury.

Below are 10 common indicators:

  1. Stalking: questioning your every move and telling you that they love you and are being protective
  2. Texting or calling you constantly; telling you they are concerned about you and want to make sure your safe
  3. Control of your finances; force you to account in detail what you spend
  4. Criticize you for every little thing you do
  5. Humiliate you in front of your family and friends
  6. Angers easily, particularly if he or she is drinking
  7. Force you to have sex against your will
  8. Hits or punches you
  9. Jealous of friendships or any other outside relationships
  10. Isolation from family and friends

If you can say yes to even one of these you are in an abusive relationship!

  1. Don’t ignore the problem, be prepared and make a safety plan
  2. Often in a calm stage, victims chose to remain in a relationship hopeful that the abuser will change
  3. It is important to have a safety plan in the event the violence erupts again
  4. Call a shelter if you do not have elsewhere to go, find out about legal options or other resources available to you before you have to use them
  5. Prepare an emergency bag, extra cash, checkbook, savings account, identification, medical insurance card and address book
  6. Keep the emergency bag in a safe place where the abuser cannot find it
  7. Know exactly where to go and how to get there; even if the battery should occur in the middle of the night
  8. Leave the situation; take the kids with you
  9. If you are in immediate danger call 911